Evidence Based Exercise

50 AND COUNTING!!!

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This week marks our 50th podcast episode!

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In honor of this week’s podcast episode #50 we are excited to once again be joined by our friend, and fellow evidence-based exercise specialist Patty Durell from Rock Solid Fitness. Patty was kind enough to take some time from her very busy schedule to visit with us, and chat about where we are, where we’ve been, and where we want to go.

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Join Jesse, Liam, and Patty Durell as we discuss things we have learned during our first 50 episodes such as how we stay fresh and focused, things we have learned from some of our amazing guests, how we maintain our work/friendship relationship as we move our business forward, and what we are looking forward to as we expand our presence into the social media world and beyond.

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Jesse and I would like to thank all of our listeners out there, and invite you to reach out to us anytime with questions. We are here to help you. Let us know what type of content you would like to hear more of. Who would you like us to have on our show as a guest? What topics do you want us to dig into a little deeper?

Drop us a line at contact@truthnottrendspodcast.com

We are ready to help you with all your fitness needs!


Get ready to embrace an active lifestyle that you’ll love.

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In this week’s podcast #49 we are joined by Dr. Michelle Segar. Dr Segar is a motivational scientist, and leads the Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy (SHARP) Center at the University of Michigan.

Michelle's primary mission is to help people who have struggled to stay motivated as well as the professionals who work with them.

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Her book No Sweat translates years of research on exercise and motivation into a simple four-point program that will empower you to break the cycle of exercise failure once and for all.

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You’ll discover why you should forget about willpower and stop gritting your teeth through workouts you hate. Instead, you’ll become motivated from the inside out and start to crave physical activity. You’ll be hooked!

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Practical, proven, and loaded with inspiring stories, No Sweat makes getting fit easier and more fun than you ever imagined.

TAKU’s NOTE: T.N.T. and Dr. Segar agree that there is real value, and health benefits from behaviors like obtaining enough quality sleep and embracing an active lifestyle. Her research suggests that people are more likely to sustain health behaviors if they understand that they are essential to their daily lives. So stop looking for that perfect parking space…A little extra walking will do you some good.

On-Demand Strength Training

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In this week’s podcast episode #45 we are very excited to have as our guest, Richard J. Wolff, RD, LDN

Richard has dedicated his life to helping people live well. He earned a degree in nutritional sciences from the College of Health and Human Sciences at Northern Illinois University and has taught at one of America’s top 100 hospitals. As a registered dietitian and licensed nutritionist, Richard serves on the Health and Wellness Advisory Board at Northern Illinois University and is an adjunct faculty in the graduate school of nutrition. Richard completed an internship in medical nutrition therapy at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL.

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After 21 years in the fitness business with his brothers Richard founded MEDFITNESS in 2009. MEDFITNESS is a strength training studio that specializes in efficient, evidence-based personal training. Their core focus is On-Demand Strength Training (TM). A training system they developed that provides personal training without appointments or high prices. They supervise over 1000 strength workouts per month and have been featured in Club Industry and Neighbors Magazines for their innovative approach to strength training. Their core purpose is to make life better with innovative strength training programs.

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Here are the six things that support the execution and management of the MEDFITNESS On-Demand Strength Training™ system.

1.Simple Workouts: They have several workouts that clients rotate between, making it simple to move clients from exercise to exercise.  This allows the trainer to focus on what matters most – coaching!

2. Standardized Training: They use a standard repetition cadence, and range. This makes it easier for one trainer to move between clients, and provide relevant coaching.

3. Scheduled Shifts: This type of training can be offered within a limited time range, and on certain days of the week. For example, you could begin by offering on-demand training on Monday and Thursday from 8 AM to 12 PM, then add more shifts as enrollment increases.

4. Coaching Formula: They have created a Coaching Formula that combines one-on-one and group coaching to effectively coach every client on every exercise.

5. Weekly Accountability:  At the end of each workout, they verbally confirm the next workout date, and make phone calls to clients who drop below attendance standards every 14 days.

6. Progress Reports: They provide clients printed Progress Reports that measures progression against goals set at the beginning of the program.

TAKU’s NOTE: Richard Wolf of MEDFITNESS has been in the strength training business for over 30 years. He produces some great content on his YouTube Channel (check out the video below for a sample). Jesse and I were lucky enough to meet Richard at the the 2019 R.E.C. If you’re in the Chicago area I highly recommend that you stop in for a workout.

Train Sane for the New Year

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Suddenly everywhere we look the workouts have gone insane. What’s that all about? Anyone who has read my stuff regularly, knows that I believe in hard work. However, just because a workout is named something that sounds tough, and or gets you out of breath, does not mean it is a smart or viable way to train long term.

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The truth is the number one type of exercise we can do for our health is strength training, And the number one reason folks don’t feel that they can workout is lack of time. With this in mind,why choose a program that says you need to confuse your muscles and workout 5 – 6 – or 7 days per week for an hour or more? The truth is that anyone from the elite athlete to the un-fit office worker can get all they need from two or three well thought out 30 or 45 minute workouts per week.

What’s that saying about a fool and his money? I’ve noticed that the “insane” workout folks are now trying to sell agility ladders and other tools to make folks more athletic etc. Don’t fall for the hype. Unless you want to be a world champion at using the agility ladder, don’t bother buying or using one. No matter what anyone tells you, it will not give you better footwork for your chosen sport.

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If you are a soccer player, what do you think will be more beneficial:

A: 30 minutes of agility ladder drills.

B: 30 minutes of extra time spent practicing skills with a soccer ball for improved ball mastery?

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Let’s talk science for a moment.

1. Purported “speed drills” that do not replicate exact sprinting body mechanics (same speed, muscle contractions, angles of force output, etc.) may not transfer to improve speed. Again, the principle of specificity states that to become proficient in any activity, the activity itself must me practiced exactly. Anything “almost” or “close” is NOT exact. Therefore, general drills such as high knees, skips, bounds, box jumps, or other slower-moving actions (relative to all-out sprinting speed) can be used, but more as a part of a dynamic warm-up routine.

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2. Straight-ahead sprinting and change-of-direction agility drills elicit a “plyometric”(stretch-shortening) effect. Therefore, whenever you’re sprinting and doing agilities, your doing plyometrics. No need to spend an inordinate amount of time jumping on and off boxes.

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3.  Speed gadgets and gimmicks such as parachutes, rubber tubing, sleds, weighted vests, and the like are nothing exceptional. They by themselves will not make you “run like the wind” after their use. They can be used for variety in a conditioning program (repeated use can create fatigue), but that’s about it. It is a fact that running with weight or against resistance alters running mechanics from those used in unweighted sprinting you’ll experience during a game (sport-specific). Therefore, keep your running both sport and energy system-specific by replicating the situations / runs you’ll face in competition.

To find out how intelligent athletes train, check out the S.P.I.C.E. article from last August, and the November 2018 Article: Strength Training for Athletes

So to sum up, it’s not about feeling tired, sweating profusely or earning a T-shirt…It’s about consistent and progressive hard work on brief, intense, and infrequent programs designed to support your goals.

Remember Train Smart, Win easy.

TAKU

Ten Things we know about STRENGTH TRAINING

This week’s podcast features an age old debate: MACHINES VS FREE WEIGHTS. Check below for 10 things we know after years and years of experience...

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1. For muscle to grow and become stronger, it must be exposed to an overload stress. INTENSITY of effort is the key.

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2. Muscle will adapt to the stress if given enough time to recover. Adequate RECOVERY time between workouts is the key.

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3. For further adaptation (improvement), greater overload stresses must be applied. PROGRESSION of overload is the key.

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4. To improve further, or maintain current ability, the overload stress must occur regularly. CONSISTENCY in training is the key.

5. Creating high tension in the muscle fibers and working to momentary muscular failure involves the greatest amount of relative muscle tissue. Effort (working to fatigue) and using good form (controlled movement with no bouncing or jerking) are important here. If in doubt, slow it down and aim for maximum repetitions (safely).

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6. Muscle overload can be applied with a variety of tools: barbells, dumbbells, machines, manually applied resistance, body weight, sand bags, etc. Anything that can create high tension in the muscles can be used.

7. A variety of exercise prescriptions can be used provided muscle overload occurs, such as heavy resistances / few repetitions, lighter resistances / more repetitions, minimal exercise bouts (i.e., 1 to 3 sets per muscle group) and / or varied rest time between sets and exercises (i.e., 30 seconds to 3:00+).

8. No matter the speed of movement used, muscle fibers are recruited in a fixed order: slow twitch / type 1 --> intermediate / type 2 --> fast twitch / type 2A --> fast twitch / type 2B & 2C. Generally speaking, if the demand is low, the slow/type 1 fibers are called upon. As the demand for EFFORT increases, the higher threshold, fast / type 2 fibers are called upon.

9. There is no skill transfer from a weight room exercise to a totally different athletic skill done in competition. The principle of specificity clearly states that for a positive transfer to occur, exactness in a number of factors must be present. The fact is, no weight room exercise exactly replicates any sport skill (other than the sports of weightlifting and power lifting). That is why one should practice his / her sport skills separately, then generally improve total-body weight room strength.

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10. Although anyone can alter their strength, muscle size and body composition via strength training, their genetic endowment effects the magnitude of potential gains in the weight room. Those blessed with a high percentage of the slow / type 1 muscle fibers may not develop large muscles or great strength. Likewise, those who more easily get bigger and super-strong most likely possess a greater volume of the larger, more powerful type 2 fibers. Also, longer arms / legs and unfavorable muscle origins and insertions hinder great strength demonstration. Ultra-strong humans – male or female – usually have exceptional body leverages to allow for this.

TAKU’s NOTE: The Machine Vs Free Weight argument is likely to rage on for many years to come. There is a lot of great information out there, but always more research to be done. Both methods of resistance training, provide significant benefits if performed appropriately. Any difference in strength improvement is mainly associated to a difference in the intensity adopted during the training.

At T.N.T. we feel the ideal solution is to learn to use as many tools as possible. No specific modality of workout has  demonstrated absolute overall superiority: free weights, elastic bands, and resistance machines should be considered complementary methods of training, since each of them have specific benefits.

Bob Sikora: STRENGTH COACH Extraordinaire!!

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This week on our podcast we feature an interview with our friend Bob Sikora. Bob is a Strength Coach who traveled the world as a representative for MedX. He has worked with participants in the Marines, the FBI, the CIA and the Navy. Bob has also designed comprehensive strength and conditioning programs for professional and elite amateur athletes as well as individuals of all fitness levels.

Bob is a proponent of safe, efficient, and effective exercise methods. Check out the video below to see him in action putting someone through a brutal Pre-exhaust leg workout.

TAKU’s NOTE: The video above is actually the middle portion of a four exercise GIANT SET using MedX equipment. The GIANT SET includes, Leg Press, followed immediately by leg extension, body-weight squat, and finishing with leg curls. All sets taken to Momentary Muscular Failure. 

MedX: Superior Technology

About MedX Technology

MedX is recognized as the Gold Standard for treating and reducing chronic back pain and dysfunction through specific spinal strengthening. The Universities of Florida and San Diego, along with various orthopedic clinics around the world, have published some of the most compelling research to date. This research shows that specific spinal strengthening exercises using the MedX Lumbar and Cervical Extension Machines help people get better, even after multiple failed attempts at other forms of treatment. It has since helped tens of thousands of people around the world reduce or eliminate their back pain.

MedX Medical Low-Back machine

MedX Medical Low-Back machine

The MedX Lumbar and Cervical Extension Machines have been clinically proven to be extremely effective in the treatment of chronic back and neck pain. Until MedX developed their patented restraint systems, there was never an effective way to isolate and strengthen the muscles of the spine.

MedX 4-Way Neck

MedX 4-Way Neck

Rehabilitation providers worldwide have experienced outstanding outcomes using the MedX Lumbar and Cervical Extension Machines. This is attributed to medical evidence that shows that the majority of patients with chronic spinal pain are significantly "deconditioned". Weakness of the musculature of the spine can lead to many conditions such as herniated discs, facet syndrome, and degenerative joint disease. A strong spine provides a strong foundation that allows for healthy spaces between the vertebrae, which helps prevent spinal compression.

With more than 40 published articles in peer-reviewed journals, the proof lies in both the research and the testimonials of thousands of people around the world.

EVIDENCE BASED EXERCISE GUIDELINES

By TAKU

Here are 16 useful Evidence Based Exercise Guidelines to keep your training safe, efficient, and effective.

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1. Perceived effort is a good measure of intensity. Rather than focusing on protocols that use different percentages of 1 RM, focus on perceived effort. Using different percentages of 1 RM is not a good way to prescribe exercise programs. This is because across individuals, and different muscle groups, and different exercises, the same percentage of a 1 RM can yield a different number of repetitions. Such differences can exist within an individual. This means that for some people and for any exercise an individual performs, the prescription can be too hard or too easy, rendering it ineffective.

2. Different repetitions and resistance can yield the same degree of effort when the maximum repetitions are performed in a set. This means that a wide range of repetitions for a set can be equally effective. For example, a very high degree of effort and intensity can be reached in a set where you perform six repetitions in good form with a heavy resistance and ‘fail’ on an attempt at a seventh repetition or where you perform 12 repetitions with a more moderate weight and ‘fail’ on an attempt at a 13th repetition. In either case, the maximum recruitment of muscle fiber motor units would have occurred. You can choose to train with any number of repetitions with an effective set taking between about 30 seconds and 90 seconds.

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3. There is no evidence that there is a separate way to train for strength or endurance. As you become stronger, you will increase your absolute muscular endurance. For example, if through training, you increase your strength in a movement from 60 lbs to 85 lbs, you may increase the number of repetitions you can perform with 40 lbs from 12 to 20. No special training is required to increase endurance. For each person and for each exercise and muscle group, relative muscular endurance is stable and appears genetically based. For example, a beginner’s 1 RM on an exercise may be 100 lbs and the trainee can perform 8 repetitions with 80 lbs (80%). Two years later, the trainee can do a 1 RM with 200 lbs and perform 8 repetitions with 160 lbs (80%). Relative endurance using a percent of 1 RM hasn’t changed and evidence indicates that it will not change. Protocols assuming that the relationship can be changed are not based on scientific research.

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4.  Based on raising a resistance in about 3 seconds and lowering the resistance in 3 seconds, performing several to 15 repetitions can be effectively used. If longer duration repetitions are performed such as using a 5- 5 or 10-10 (10 or 20 seconds for 1 repetition) then fewer repetitions can be used.

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5.  Increasing bone mineral density may depend upon using somewhat lower repetitions such as 6-8 and therefore training with somewhat greater resistance. A variety of exercises can be used because the effect of resistance training on bone mineral density is site specific.

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6. To increase strength, training has to produce an overload beyond a minimal threshold. Maximum effort produces maximum intensity and the greatest stimulus but the maximum stimulus may not produce any greater adaptation than a somewhat sub-maximal effort if there is some marginal overload. This means you should focus on progression while using great form and not an absolute maximum effort where form may be compromised.

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7. Train through as complete a range of motion that is comfortable for you.

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8. Assuming all the other variables are kept constant, the intensity of training can be increased by increasing the weight, number of repetitions, and by reducing momentum through increasing the repetition’s duration. Muscular tension for an exercise may be maintained and intensity increased by not ‘locking-out’ on multiple joint exercises such as squats and bench press.

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9. There is no evidence that any one exercise is better than any other exercise for a specific muscle group. There is no evidence that performing an exercise a specific way such as on a stability ball produces better outcomes for strength or endurance than if the exercise is performed in another way. The exercises are simply different.

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10. A variety of exercises can be used for each muscle group and can perhaps provide some physiological and psychological benefits beyond consistently performing the same exercise for a muscle group. However, a variety of exercises for each muscle group need not be performed in one training session but rather across training sessions.

11. While a few researchers have shown better outcomes for strength and muscular hypertrophy with multiple set protocols, the overall evidence does not support the performance of multiple sets of each exercise or higher volume training.

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12. A guideline is to take about 3-5 seconds to raise the resistance and about 3-5 seconds to lower the resistance using a full range of motion for each repetition. Longer duration repetitions may decrease momentum and increase intensity.

13. There is not any consistent evidence that the stimulus (repetition performance, number, duration, volume of training) for experienced trainees needs to be different than for beginning trainees. Therefore, there is little or no basis for special ‘advanced’ routines promoted by some organizations, websites, and magazines.

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14. A program for any trainee can consist of eight to 10 exercises performed two to three days per week. Different exercises for each muscle group could be varied across workouts. For example, a squat can be used for the thighs in the first workout in a week and the leg press can be used in the second workout.

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15. One set per exercise performed to volitional fatigue can be used with from 5-6 to 15 repetitions in a set if a 3-5 second (positive / negative), duration repetition is employed.

16. Training should be on two or three non-consecutive days in the week.